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U.S. Army Center of Military History
Spring 2013 Issue of Army History Magazine

In this Issue:

The Doughboys Make Good:
American Victories at St. Mihiel and Blanc Mont Ridge
By Mark E. Grotelueschen

The Indomitable Dr. Augusta:
The First Black Physician in the U.S. Army
By Gerald S. Henig

Army History Magazine
Spring 2013 Issue

CMH: March 21, 2013

The Spring 2013 issue of Army History opens with an article by Mark E. Grotelueschen, a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Air Force and an associate professor of history at the United States Air Force Academy, about the contributions of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) during the final months of World War I. Grotelueschen highlights two specific examples of successful AEF offensive actions and argues that these attacks are emblematic of the type of underappreciated battlefield advances to which the AEF contributed. The author readily acknowledges that the AEF has its detractors but hopes that as we approach the centennial celebration of American involvement in the war that current and future scholarship will allow for a reevaluation of the AEF's record.

Next, we recognize an African American pioneer who broke down barriers, not only in the field of medicine, but also in the U.S. Army. During his lifetime, Alexander T. Augusta collected a number of African American "firsts." Born in Virginia, he completed his education and training as a physician in Canada, returning to his native country after the outbreak of the Civil War, determined to offer his skills as a doctor in service to the Union Army. Author Gerald S. Henig, emeritus professor of history at California State University, East Bay, details the numerous instances of racial bigotry that Augusta had to endure, both within and outside the Army. Ever defiant, the good doctor persisted, often bringing to light the discrimination that black soldiers still faced in the "emancipated" North.

This issue's Army Artifact Spotlight highlights not a single artifact, but rather a collection that symbolizes one of the many Army transformations during the World War II years. The William S. Barrett Collection is part of the core collection of artifacts of the U.S. Army and is focused on the evolution of artillery from horse-drawn to mechanized.

In his Chief's Corner, the chief of military history recounts the many accomplishments of the Army history community during the last year. The chief historian, in his Footnote, draws attention to the long tenure of cooperation between the National Park Service and the U.S. Army, calling for the Army history community to emulate the Park Service's "Post to Parks" program. As always, I ask for your submissions on the history of the Army and for your comments on this publication.

- Managing Editor



Images from this edition's feature:
"The Doughboys Make Good: American Victories at St. Mihiel and Blanc Mont Ridge

The first American troops arriving at St. Nazaire, France, 26 June 1917

The first American troops arriving at St. Nazaire, France, 26 June 1917

The huge influx of American materiel greatly aided the beleaguered Allied war effort.

The huge influx of American materiel greatly aided the beleaguered Allied war effort.

Troops of the 18th Infantry passing through St. Baussant, France, in advance on St. Mihiel front, 13 September 1918

Troops of the 18th Infantry passing through St. Baussant, France, in advance on St. Mihiel front, 13 September 1918

Columns of German prisoners taken by the Americans in the first day of the assault on the St. Mihiel salient, 25 September 1918

Columns of German prisoners taken by the Americans in the first day of the assault on the St. Mihiel salient, 25 September 1918

General Naulin (center), shown here in Casablanca with unidentified French officers in 1925

General Naulin (center), shown here in Casablanca with unidentified French officers in 1925