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- CMH REMEMBERS -

National African American History Month, 2013


Troops of Company G, 24th Infantry, ready to move to the firing lines, 18 July 1950

Black Soldier, White Army - The 24th Infantry Regiment in Korea

"Black Soldier, White Army" is a powerful, unvarnished account of the experiences of the African American 24th Infantry regiment, which was stigmatized for its deficiencies while its accomplishments passed largely into oblivion. William T. Bowers, William M. Hammond, and George L. MacGarrigle reveal that the 24th suffered from a virulent racial prejudice that ate incessantly at the bonds of unit cohesion and that hindered the emergence of effective leadership. The story takes its place in a growing body of literature that details the service of African Americans to their nation. It offers profound lessons for study and reflection by unit leaders in today's Army.

Black Soldier, White Army - The 24th Infantry Regiment in Korea

The 107th U.S. Colored Infantry served in Virginia and North Carolina before spending its last year, 18651866, guarding ordnance stores and other public property around Washington, D.C. In this cracked image, men of the regiment form in front of the guardhouse at Fort Corcoran, across the Potomac from Georgetown.

Freedom By The Sword: The U.S. Colored Troops, 1862-1867

The Civil War changed the United States in many ways - economic, political, and social. Of these changes, none was more important than Emancipation. Besides freeing nearly 4 million slaves, it brought agricultural wage labor to a reluctant South and gave a vote to black adult males in the former slave states. It also offered former slaves of both sexes new opportunities in education and property ownership. Just as striking were the effects of the war on the United States Army. From late 1862 to the spring of 1865, the federal government accepted more than 180,000 black men as soldiers, something it had never done before on such a scale. Known collectively as the United States Colored Troops and organized in segregated regiments led by white officers, some of these soldiers guarded army posts along major rivers; others fought Confederate raiders to protect Union supply trains; and still others took part in major operations like the siege of Petersburg and the battle of Nashville. After the war, many of the black regiments garrisoned the former Confederacy to enforce federal Reconstruction policy. Freedom by the Sword tells the story of these soldiers' recruitment, organization, and service. Because of the book's broad focus on every theater of the war and its concentration on what black soldiers actually contributed to Union victory, this volume stands alone among histories of the U.S. Colored Troops.

Freedom By The Sword: The U.S. Colored Troops, 1862-1867


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