Special Studies Series

FROM ROOT TO McNAMARA: ARMY ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION, 1900–1963

FROM ROOT TO McNAMARA: ARMY ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION, 1900-1963

James E. Hewes, Jr.

Special Studies Series
CMH Pub 40-1, Paper
1975, 1983; 452 pages, tables, charts, illustrations, bibliographical note, appendixes, list of abbreviations, index

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An analysis of the executive control exercised by the War Department over the men, money, and other resources required to raise, train, equip, and supply the United States Army.

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SUPPLYING WASHINGTON’S ARMY

SUPPLYING WASHINGTON'S ARMY

Erna Risch

Special Studies Series
CMH Pub 40-2, Paper
1981, 1986; 470 pages, illustrations, bibliography, index

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A study of developments and operations in the Quartermaster's, Ordnance, Clothing, and Hospital Departments and the Commissariat, illustrating how the Continental Army was maintained in the field.

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THE DEMANDS OF HUMANITY: ARMY MEDICAL DISASTER RELIEF

THE DEMANDS OF HUMANITY: ARMY MEDICAL DISASTER RELIEF

Gaines M. Foster

Special Studies Series
CMH Pub 40-3, Paper
1983, 2000; 188 pages, illustrations, bibliographical note, index

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The contribution of Army doctors, nurses, and medical corpsmen during disaster situations, with an account of the origin and development of the Army's relief mission through 1976.


ARMY COMMAND POST AND DEFENSE RESHAPING, 1987-1997

ARMY COMMAND POST AND DEFENSE RESHAPING, 1987-1997

Mark D. Sherry

Special Studies Series
CMH Pub 40-4-1, Paper
2008; 226 pages, illustrations, charts, bibliographical note, index

GPO S/N: 008-029-00480-1

The U.S. Army underwent a decade of significant transformation between 1987 and 1997 that affected strategy, force requirements, structure, and basing requirements. The end of the Cold War provided the initial impetus for defense reshaping and drove the pace and depth of change. Reductions in forces and installations, and deferred procurement of the next generation of military equipment overlapped with efforts to adapt the Army to a new global security environment.

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HISTORY OF STRATEGIC AIR AND BALLISTIC MISSILE DEFENSE, VOLUME II (1956-1972) HISTORY OF STRATEGIC AIR AND BALLISTIC MISSILE DEFENSE, VOLUME I (1945-1955)

HISTORY OF STRATEGIC AIR AND BALLISTIC MISSILE DEFENSE, VOLUME I (1945-1955) AND VOLUME II (1956-1972)

Special Studies Series
CMH Pub 40-5-1, Paper
2009; 649 pages, maps, illustrations, charts, bibliographical note, index

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In 1975, U.S. Army Center of Military History commissioned a report on the History of Strategic Air and Ballistic Missile Defense, Volume I (1945-1955) and Volume II (1956-1972), which was part of a larger study of the strategic arms competition that developed between the United States and the Soviet Union after World War II. The report addresses each country's approach to civil defense against the threat from the air and each country's emphasis on specific elements of air defense strategy at various periods between 1945 and 1972. Two central questions concerned the U.S. and Soviet defense planners: "How might we be attacked?" and "How shall we defend our country?"

Overall, technological changes were the predominant factor affecting air and missile defense strategy during the period primarily as they related to the developing offensive threat. The scope and pace of technological innovations introduced a measure of uncertainty, placed considerable strain on the stability of the U.S.-Soviet relationship, and raised fundamental challenges to previous concepts of how best to defend the United States. U.S. strategy was built on the variety of new weapon system developments; while Soviet defense trends demonstrated Soviet awareness and responded to developments in U.S. strategic offensive forces.

The basic patterns of action were set by initial, and early, strategic choices. Thereafter, the strategic problem centered on technological development. Threat perceptions increasingly involved possible application of new technologies by the Soviets in order to define or delimit future threats. Perceptions of future threats were influenced by the view of available technologies, whether or not the Soviets had demonstrated the capacity to apply them. Available or known technologies were extrapolated to assess future threats. However, a direct action-reaction cycle was not seen as a factor in the development of U.S. and Soviet strategic air and missile defense systems.

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A HISTORY OF INNOVATION: U.S. ARMY ADAPTATION IN WAR AND PEACE

A HISTORY OF INNOVATION: U.S. ARMY ADAPTATION IN WAR AND PEACE

Jon T. Hoffman, Editor

Special Studies Series
CMH Pub 40-6-1, Paper
2009; 171 pages, illustrations, suggested readings, index

GPO S/N: 008-029-00528-0

The U.S. Army has a long record of fielding innovations that not only have enhanced its effectiveness on the battlefield but also sometimes had an impact far beyond warfare. General Editor Jon T. Hoffman has brought together eleven authors who cover the gamut from the invention of the M1 Garand rifle between the world wars through the development of the National Training Center in the 1980s. While many books lay out theories about the process of innovation or detail the history of a large-scale modernization, the collection of fourteen essays in A History of Innovation: U.S. Army Adaptation in War and Peace fills a different niche in the literature. This work is neither a historical account of how the Army has adapted over time nor a theoretical look at models that purport to show how innovation is best achieved. Instead, it captures a representative slice of stories of soldiers and Army civilians who have demonstrated repeatedly that determination and a good idea often carry the day in peace and war. Despite the perception of bureaucratic inertia, the institution's long history of benefiting from the inventiveness of its people indicates that it is an incubator of innovation after all.

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